Skip to content

Source Code on Trial

Computer software source code on a screen.
Type: Webinar
Research Area: Handwriting

This CSAFE symposium was held on March 12, 2021.

Presenter:

Professor Edward Imwinkelried
Edward L. Barrett, Jr. Professor of Law Emeritus, University of California – Davis School of Law

Panelists:
Professor Ric Simmons, The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law
Professor Rebecca Wexler, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law
Doctor Mark Perlin, Cybergenetics

Presentation Description:

Over a decade has passed since The National Academy of Forensic Science’s report, Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward, called on the scientific community to examine the scientific foundations and limitations of various forensic disciplines. The report spurred important collaborations between the criminal justice and scientific communities. As a result, new probabilistic and statistical methods are rapidly being developed to analyze forensic evidence. These methods, while a promising opportunity for a scientific-driven and objective approach to forensic evidence, are implemented through computer programs. The instructions for these programs are contained within the source code.

Now, a natural question is being asked in courts across the country: should criminal defendants have access to the source code of programs used to analyze forensic evidence? In this symposium, we begin to explore the issue of access to source code in criminal trials.

Additional Resources:

Professor Edward Imwinkelried’s Slides
Professor Rebecca Wexler’s Slides

Related Resources

Handwriting Analysis at CSAFE

Handwriting Analysis at CSAFE

This CSAFE webinar was held on March 11, 2021. Presenter: Alicia Carriquiry Distinguished Professor and President’s Chair in Statistics, CSAFE Director Presentation Description: Forensic handwriting analysis relies on the principle…
A clustering method for graphical handwriting components and statistical writership analysis

A clustering method for graphical handwriting components and statistical writership analysis

Handwritten documents can be characterized by their content or by the shape of the written characters. We focus on the problem of comparing a person’s handwriting to a document of…
Bayesian hierarchical modeling for the forensic evaluation of handwritten documents

Bayesian hierarchical modeling for the forensic evaluation of handwritten documents

The analysis of handwritten evidence has been used widely in courts in the United States since the 1930s (Osborn, 1946). Traditional evaluations are conducted by trained forensic examiners. More recently,…
CSAFE 2020 All Hands Meeting

CSAFE 2020 All Hands Meeting

The 2020 All Hands Meeting was held May 12 and 13, 2020 and served as the closing to the last 5 years of CSAFE research and focused on kicking off…