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Apply our Research in Practice

Individuals in the courtroom, including judges, attorneys, and jury members, are challenged with interpreting the probabilistic evidence provided by new forensic methods. CSAFE is committed to providing up-to-date training to allow the legal community to fairly evaluate and communicate forensic conclusions. Judges, who under Daubert have the role of gate-keepers for the science that gets admitted into evidence in federal (and many) state courts, need specific knowledge to make appropriate decisions on matters of admissibility and expert testimony and to guide jurors in their deliberations when complex technical evidence is presented at trial.

Through collaborations with other national agencies, CSAFE provides legal education offerings at the intersection of forensics, statistics, and law –– both online and in-person –– to promote quantitative literacy among the legal community. Check back regularly for new offerings, and please contact us with any interest in educational collaborations or with questions.

Available Resources
For the Legal Community

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Found 126 Results
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The Costs and Benefits of Forensics

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Brandon L. Garrett

Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis famously wrote that states can be laboratories for experimentation in law and policy. Disappointingly, however, the actual laboratories that states and local governments run are not a home for experimentation. We do not have adequate…

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How do latent print examiners perceive proficiency testing? An analysis of examiner perceptions, performance, and print quality

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Sharon Kelley

Proficiency testing has the potential to serve several important purposes for crime laboratories and forensic science disciplines. Scholars and other stakeholders, however, have criticized standard proficiency testing procedures since their implementation in laboratories across the United States. Specifically, many experts…

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An Exploratory Analysis of Handwriting Features: Investigating Numeric Measurements of Writing That Are Important for Statistical Modeling

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2019 | By: Amy Crawford

The goal of this presentation is to provide insights into which features of handwritten documents are important for statistical modeling with the task of writer identification and to discuss how these features overlap with features that questioned document examiners typically…

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An algorithm to compare two‐dimensional footwear outsole images using maximum cliques and speeded‐up robust feature

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Soyoung Park

Footwear examiners are tasked with comparing an outsole impression (Q) left at a crime scene with an impression (K) from a database or from the suspect's shoe. We propose a method for comparing two shoe outsole impressions that relies on…

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Statistical Learning Algorithms for Forensic Scientists

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Alicia L. Carriquiry

The goals of this workshop are to: (1) introduce attendees to the basics of supervised learning algorithms in the context of forensic applications, including firearms and footwear examination and trace evidence, while placing emphasis on classification trees, random forests, and,…

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Statistical Analysis of Handwriting: Probabilistic Outcomes for Closed-Set Writer Identification

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Amy M. Crawford

The goal of this presentation is to provide insights into features of handwritten documents that are important for statistical modeling with the task of writer identification.

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Similarity between outsole impressions using SURF

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Soyoung Park

The learning objectives of this presentation include the following: Introduce an objective method to quantify the similarity between two outsole impressions, show that this algorithm is accurate and reliable even when outsoles share class characteristics and degree of wear, and…

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Applications of a CNN for Automatics Classification of Outsole Features

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Miranda R. Tilton

After attending this presentation, attendees will be familiar with the ways that CNNs can be applied to classify forensic pattern evidence, specifically with shoe outsole features.

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Android App Forensic Evidence Database (AndroidAED)

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Chen Shi

After attending this presentation, attendees will better understand how AndroidAED will be beneficial for academic researchers whose studies relate to mobile applications that grant them the ability to search through many of the available applications across various third-party app stores.

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A Wild Manhunt for Stego Images Created by Mobile Apps

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Li Lin

As mobile Internet and telecommunication technology develops at high speed, the digital image forensics academic community is facing a growing challenge. • Mobile applications (Apps) allow a user to easily edit/process an image for a variety of purposes. • Thanks…

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A database of handwriting samples for applications in forensic statistics

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Amy Crawford

Handwriting samples were collected from 90 adults for the purpose of developing statistical approaches to the evaluation of handwriting as forensic evidence. Each participant completed three data collection sessions, each at least three weeks apart. At each session, a survey…

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Quantifying the association between discrete event time series with applications to digital forensics

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Christopher Galbraith

We consider the problem of quantifying the degree of association between pairs of discrete event time series, with potential applications in forensic and cybersecurity settings. We focus in particular on the case where two associated event series exhibit temporal clustering…

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Score-based Likelihood Ratios for Camera Device Identification

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Stephanie Reinders

Many areas of forensics are moving away from the notion of classifying evidence simply as a match or non-match. Instead, some use score-based likelihood ratios (SLR) to quantify the similarity between two pieces of evidence, such as a fingerprint obtained…

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Algorithm mismatch in spatial steganalysis

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2019 | By: Stephanie Reinders

The number and availability of stegonographic embedding algorithms continues to grow. Many traditional blind steganalysis frameworks require training examples from every embedding algorithm, but collecting, storing and processing representative examples of each algorithm can quickly become untenable. Our motivation for…

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Score-based likelihood ratios in device identification

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Stephanie Reinders

Many areas of forensics are moving away from the notion of classifying evidence simply as a match or non-match. Instead, some use score-based likelihood ratios (SLR) to quantify the similarity between two pieces of evidence, such as a fingerprint obtained…

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Automatic Classification of Bloodstain Patterns Caused by Gunshot and Blunt Impact at Various Distances

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Yu Liu

The forensics discipline of bloodstain pattern analysis plays an important role in crime scene analysis and reconstruction. One reconstruction question is whether the blood has been spattered via gunshot or blunt impact such as beating or stabbing. This paper proposes…

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Letter to the Editor: Automatic Classification of Bloodstain Patterns

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2020 | By: Yu Liu

The forensics discipline of bloodstain pattern analysis plays an important role in crime scene analysis and reconstruction. One reconstruction question is whether the blood has been spattered via gunshot or blunt impact such as beating or stabbing. This paper proposes…

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A Robust Approach to Automatically Locating Grooves in 3D Bullet Land Scans

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Published: 2019 | By: Kiegan Rice

Land engraved areas (LEAs) provide evidence to address the same source–different source problem in forensic firearms examination. Collecting 3D images of bullet LEAs requires capturing portions of the neighboring groove engraved areas (GEAs). Analyzing LEA and GEA data separately is…

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Processing Stamp Bags for Latent Prints: Impacts of Rubric Selection and Gray-Scaling on Experimental Results

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2019 | By: B. Barnes

We report data on two open issues in our previous experimentation seeking an effective method for development of latent prints on glassine drug bags: (1) the choice of rubric to assess the quality of fingerprints and (2) the choice of…

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What do forensic analysts consider relevant to their decision making?

Type: Research Area(s):

Published: 2019 | By: Brett O. Gardner

In response to research demonstrating that irrelevant contextual information can bias forensic science analyses, authorities have increasingly urged laboratories to limit analysts' access to irrelevant and potentially biasing information (Dror and Cole (2010) [3]; National Academy of Sciences (2009) [18];…

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