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A Pioneer in Forensic Science Reform: The Work of Paul Giannelli

Journal: Case Western Law Review
Published: 2018
Primary Author: Brandon Garrett

Few can say, “I told you so,” to our entire criminal justice system. Being right about what is wrong with the use of evidence in criminal cases is not a bad thing, but being able to influence the growing response to the crisis in modern forensics must be still more gratifying. Paul Giannelli is one of the rare law professors who was far ahead of his time in anticipating serious problems in the law that were not noticed and not carefully studied. Giannelli has helped to bring the field around to an understanding of the real scope of those problems and he has tirelessly worked to advance our knowledge in scholarship and in policymaking. If the law has not adequately corrected all of the problems that Giannelli continues to play a pioneering role in bringing to light, that is through no inadequacy of his own diagnoses and recommended cures. It is an honor to have the opportunity to contribute to this tribute honoring his work on the occasion of his retirement.

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